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REPORTING · 21st November 2012
Merv Ritchie
Update 3 The Vessel was travelling at 20 knots as it passed West Kinahan Island and was doing a full 18 knots when it should have been making a course correction and ran aground running at approximately 11 knots.

Update 2 It appears, though we have no direct confirmation, the ship was freed at approximately 7:15 am and is now berthing at the Port of Prince Rupert Maher Terminals with the tugs Smit Humber and Smit Mississippi as escorts.

Original report

News reports this morning advise of a container ship running aground near Prince Rupert. At the time of this report six tug boats are gathered west of Port Edward between Lelu Island and the Kinahan Islands, just north of Kitson Island Marine Provincial Park.

The Smit Dawn, Smit Humber, Smit Mississippi, Smit Nass, Smit Skeena and CCGS Dauphin are all on the scene.

Update

New reports state the vessel is the Hanjin Geneva, a 278 metre container vessel flagged in Germany arriving from Shanghai.

The Transportation Safety Board has just released thie following information.

The Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) is deploying a team of investigators to the site of the grounding of the container ship Hanjin Geneva near Prince Rupert, British Columbia. The TSB will gather information and assess the occurrence.

From the Port of Prince Rupert

Pilotage
Every ship that is over 350 gross tons is subject to compulsory pilotage.


The Hanjin Geneva is rated at 65918 gross tons.

We have contacted the communications office of the Coast Guard as well as the Department of Fisheries and Ocean, and are awaiting confirmation a Pilot was on board or not.

Hanjin Geneva - Ken Harris photo from marinetraffic.com
Hanjin Geneva - Ken Harris photo from marinetraffic.com
Screen shot from MarineTraffic.com
Screen shot from MarineTraffic.com
The route it was supposed to take and finally did take after being freed from the sand bar.  Screen shot from MarineTraffic.com
The route it was supposed to take and finally did take after being freed from the sand bar. Screen shot from MarineTraffic.com
The Vessel was travelling at 20 knots as it passed West Kinshan Island and was doing a full 18 knots when it should have been making a course correction to the north. Beached at roughly 11 knots.
The Vessel was travelling at 20 knots as it passed West Kinshan Island and was doing a full 18 knots when it should have been making a course correction to the north. Beached at roughly 11 knots.
What does this mean for oil tankers
Comment by Shelilah Marie on 5th December 2012
Is this the same route that is on the government tv ads about how safe the route for oil tankers is?
Kinahans
Comment by Terry on 22nd November 2012
I heard it first on cftk tv . I would never have ever thought they got their info from you Merv . Please accept my deepest apology for slandering the terrace and kitimat dailys in such a horrible way . I erroneously thought you were given the release from msm .
Kinahan
Comment by Terry on 21st November 2012
As long as I can remember they have been called the kinahans east and west . I thought when I read the story . Where the heck are they . I just dug up my chart and yes they are the kinahans unless the name has been changed . Is this msm trying to further muddy the waters . And anyone that has ever been in a shipping lane on either fishing boat or freighter would laugh them self sick at them saying . We was trying to avoid a fishing boat your honour . What a bunch of bs . They must think we are all stupid . They should get their butts kicked just for lying . And where the heck was the pilot .

EdNote: Sorry for the spelling error, the 's' is beside the 'a' and the error just got repeated from there. Kinshan should be Kinahan. Thanks for pointing it out. Oh, and we are not flattered to be called "mainstream'. Please avoid such insults.
How about reckless endangerment.
Comment by m on 21st November 2012
Will the bc pilotage association still get paid for this latest fiasco? by the way how does the bc pilotage association get away with what they do as they are a private for profit corporation. why do they get paid when foreign ships come into our homeland and we get nothing.
The fishing boat joke
Comment by Merv Ritchie on 21st November 2012
To avoid a fishing vessel, as is the current excuse being provided to the public by the mainfools media, the vessel would have had to make a different directional manoeuvre.
In this case, the vessel was supposed to turn north long earlier than it did. This is a very similar track to the Queen of the North, which failed to make a navigational correction at the appropriate time. The track of this vessel appears to have failed to turn north and ran straight ahead too far. Like the Queen, this cargo vessel ran straight ahead into a sandbar. We still wait for confirmation a Pilot was on board. If one was, there is clearly a problem, even with our Pilots.

To accept this happened to avoid a fishing boat is beyond ridiculous.
Good thing
Comment by Dave B on 21st November 2012
Good thing Enbridge tankers won't have fishing boats (and pleasure craft) to avoid in the Douglas Channel (LOL)
Imagine a tanker...
Comment by Marie on 21st November 2012
Only shows how precarious this all is!! Who knows what the containers have in them! Chemicals?