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REPORTING · 3rd September 2010
CBC News
A fuel tanker carrying 9˝ million litres of diesel fuel has run aground in the Northwest Passage, the Canadian Coast Guard confirmed Thursday.

Read more: HERE.

Woodward's has worked out a plan with the Nunavut government to free the beached tanker. Fuel will be pumped from it to another tanker until the stranded tanker is light enough to float. That operation could take more than a week.

Last month, another tanker owned by Woodward's ran aground near Pangnirtung, on southern Baffin Island.

The tanker had finished unloading a bulk shipment of gasoline on Aug. 8 when it became grounded in the local harbour, tipping at an angle in low tide.

No fuel spilled from that ship, which eventually became dislodged in high tide within hours. But the incident alarmed Pangnirtung community officials, who said they are not prepared to deal with a major fuel spill.

Ugyuk said a major spill in Gjoa Haven would have been devastating.

"I don't know if people are prepared for it. I know we're prepared for a small fuel leak," she said.
So tell me!!!!
Comment by James Ippel on 8th September 2010
I presume that this tanker was delivering winter fuel for the communites in isolated areas. It ran aground on an unchartered reef. Who is responsible? Is it the Gov't for not providing the proper maps, or is it the shipping comany delivering the much needed winter fuel? I would respectfully suggest that the governing authority should take the inititative and ensure that the shipping industry have the current information for the safe transportation of dangerous goods.
This tanker was double hulled, and no damage or leakage occured. These are the same kind of tankers that would be used by Enbridge in the Douglas Channel, so take heed! Sometimes mankind can build something that is safe.
never prepared...
Comment by Trevor Amos on 7th September 2010
i don't think any amount of preparedness would suffice...the damage, even if it was negligible, wold still be a catastophe. we are losing so much in the way of ecosytems these days that we can ill afford to lose anymore...no matter where it is.